Saint Paul’s Prefects Take Life-Saving Course

April 16th, 2014

Thirty four prefects from Saint Paul’s Catholic High School in Wythenshawe took part in the Heart Start programme, the British Heart Foundation’s initiative which aims to significantly improve the chances of survival for people who suffer a cardiac arrest in the community.

The training, delivered by the Army Reserves from 207 Field Hospital, Manchester, teaches the pupils the skills needed to keep someone alive until professional help arrives.

Every year around 140,000 people in the UK suffer a heart attack. Many of these people then suffer a cardiac arrest and die before reaching hospital. Without resuscitation, cardiac arrest is always fatal. Performing CPR immediately can double the chances of survival.

As well as learning the life-saving skills, the programmes promotes community spirit, inclusiveness, and individual self-esteem and it gives students confidence, by preparing them to cope with emergency situations.

“The active hands-on approach of the course really appealed to our pupils,” explained Mr Darren Mawn, Head of Year 11. “It enhances the pupils’ life skills and it’s fun to learn.”

Mr Mawn added: “The pupils learned how to assess a conscious or unconscious casualty; how to make a 999 call; how to put the casualty in the recovery position, open an airway, check for normal breathing; and how to perform CPR, help someone who is choking, manage someone with a suspected heart attack and deal with serious bleeding.”

“It was a great privilege working with the pupils on the day and I would offer my congratulations to those who participated in the programme. Their enthusiasm was tremendous and they participated with great gusto,” commented Lt Col PD Cook who led the training.

“Life-threatening emergencies are relatively common and many more people can be saved if simple life-saving skills are performed immediately by someone at the scene,” said Mrs Fiona Minshall, Head Teacher at Saint Paul’s. “The training focused on the practical skills of emergency life-saving, providing maximum time for practice and hands-on learning using resuscitation training manikins. The prefects responded well to the implied responsibility of being able to save a life”

IMPROVED FACILITIES AT COLLEGE

April 15th, 2014

Refurbishment at The Sixth Form College, Solihull has yielded improved teaching facilities for young people, as the College’s main building has been improved.

Hampton building, the oldest building at the Widney Manor Road College, and also the largest of the College’s eight buildings, has been significantly refurbished and improved over the last nine months in a project worth £1.1 million. The improvements, completed by contractors Stepnell and funded in part by a government grant, have just been finished and will become fully operational at the end of the month, as the Summer Term begins.

The work was completed in three phases to minimise the disruption to teaching. Social Sciences, Humanities and Earth Studies were relocated first, moving to other parts of the campus for several months, while renovations to their usual classrooms took place. When that section of the building was done, they were able to move back in and Phase two started. This saw many Business, Maths and Economics lessons relocate temporarily. Phase three refurbished the Modern Foreign Language, more Maths and Business rooms, as well as two lectures theatres.

The refurbishment has seen some walls being knocked down to turn some small rooms into larger classrooms. New floors, ceilings, windows and doors, not to mention a new coat of paint and new furniture have added up to bright and modern new teaching facilities.

The external cladding is what is most noticeable about the building work, incorporating the College’s green and purple corporate colours, as well as some of the College’s secondary palette of colours too. The new windows that have been fitted also ensure the College is more energy efficient as well.

Janice Hamilton is Vice Principal at the College and she has been delighted with the transformation. “The design is bright, vibrant and eye-catching and makes the College look modern and welcoming. That’s just the outside, but inside the teaching facilities have been significantly improved as well as that’s the most important thing. Our current students, not to mention the new students who come in the future, will benefit from these improved facilities. I must also thank the contractors for their efforts and our own Estates team, who have worked tirelessly during this very demanding project.”